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Rio Tinto Ad a Winner among Canada's Youth

The new Rio Tinto recruitment campaign has created a stir in the business community. They are so dramatic, that people are asking for the composer and copies of the music tracks. The images are big, the words are in multiple languages, and they have even beat out the creativity of the Canadian Armed Forces ads that did the job. Canada is no longer recruiting people to the Armed Forces. All opportunities have been fulfilled. There are lessons here for the people engaged in the employee retention and recruitment wars.

So if your thought your web site with drawings of trucks, sulking teenagers in school, and words like kool where good enough, think again. Riot Tinto took a page out of the inspired by Iceland campaign. Here is what they are saying on-line

I’m joining the Forces to be a pilot, but if I was interested in the trades I’d be out of my seat as soon as I saw this add! It’s fantastic, and Rio Tinto sounds like a great place to work. And what’s the song called?!

wasteofspace1234 1 week ago

AWESOME commercial! BC boy here, always loved the trades world. Was drooling throughout the whole video! Although to be honest i’v never herd of you guys before these commercials, glad to see your doing some public relations on the big! Keep up the great work up there.

YTBYlover 1 week ago

i work in the army . im currently working on battle tanks and heavy equpitment operator as and ARV Driver. Im looking towards enjoying Rio Tintos Company i wish i had more info .on the type of qualifications i need n experince .

jacson747 1 week ago

Saw this on the X-factor tonight, hunted it down thru ur corporate site (youtube search for rio tinto commercial came up with no results…maybe you could make it easier to find?) im just finishing highschool and this really caught my attention and made me want to work in the canadian natural resources industries. thanks.

fluffybun0 1 month ago

Saw a version of this commercial on TV tonight on X-factor. What a great approach to recruitment. The people who put this together should be commended, not just for insightful HR approach, but for putting a great face on mining in Canada as well. The shorter version of the commercial, captures every bit of the excitement I feel about working in the industry. Thank you.

TwistDahlia 1 month ago 2

http://jobs.riotinto.ca/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9A5en5zK14&feature=channel_video_title

Has British Columbia become a Zombie economy

Bill Gates Cream PieIf you read through the article in the Atlantic and exchange the word resource for military institution, you might see British Columbia in a new light. Our biggest untracked export these days is intellectual property, mostly from small and medium Enterprise. No wonder the Metro communities are stymied for a rational strategy. All of this is so far under the radar they can’t access it as neatly as the BC Business Council for major employers. The problem here is that the people driving this economy are not association joiners. They are independent.

The email Charter: Sign on today

Patrick Nelson Marshall Economic Developer

Find more at TEDChris

1. Respect Recipients’ Time | This is the fundamental rule. As the message sender, the onus is on YOU to minimize the time your email gobbles at the other end — even if it means taking more time at your end before sending.

2. Be Easy to Process | This means: crisp sentences, unambiguous questions, keep it short. If the email absolutely has to be longer than 100 words, make sure the first sentence is clear about the basic reason for writing.

3. Choose Clear Subject Lines. | Here are some that don’t work:

  • Subject: Re: re: re: re
  • Subject:
  • Subject: Hello from me!
  • Subject: next week….
  • Subject: MY AMAZING NEW SHOW starts next week at the Vctory Theater at 113-86 Broad Lane, every night 8 PM 6/7–7/12

Here are some that do:

  • Subject: TED Partnership Proposal
  • Subject: Rescheduling today’s dinner with Sarah G.
  • Subject: Noon meeting cancelled (eom).

EOM means ‘end of message.’ It’s a fine gift to your recipient. They don’t have to spend the time actually opening the message.

4. Short Does Not Mean Rude! | Let’s mutually agree that it’s OK for emails — and replies — to be really short. They don’t have to include the usual social niceties, though the occasional emoticon is no bad thing ;-) . No one wants to come over as brusque, so don’t take it that way. We just want our lives back!

5. Slow Does Not Mean Uncaring! | Let’s also agree that it’s OK if someone doesn’t respond quickly, or ever. I’s not that they don’t love you. They may just not want to be owned by their in-box. Avoid sending chasing emails, unless you’re desperate. It’s only exacerbating the problem.

6. Abhor Open-Ended Questions | It’s really mean to send someone an email with four long paragraphs of turgid text followed by “Thoughts?”. It’s generous to figure out how you can offer people simple yes/no questions – or multiple choice! “When you have a moment could you let me know if you’re A) firmly in favor, B) mildly in favor C) against or D) no opinion. Thanks!”

7. Cut Gratuitous Responses | You don’t need to reply to every email. If I say “Thanks for your note. I’m in.” You don’t have to reply “Great.” That just cost me another 30 seconds. If you must confirm, put it in the subject line with an ‘eom’.

8. Think Before you cc: | Cc:’s are like mating bunnies. Like Tribbles from Star Trek. Like spilling a tub of olive oil-coated spaghetti on a well-waxed floor. Like too many metaphors. Most of them are unneccessary, and they are hard to get rid of. The rule should be: for every additional cc, you must increase the time you spend making sure your outgoing email is crisp and that it’s clear who needs to respond, if anyone. And if you reply to an email, take care to ask whether you really need to include everyone cc’ed on the original email.

9. Speak Softly | DO NOT USE ALL CAPS IN THE BODY OF YOUR EMAIL. It’s rather like screaming at someone. And they’re hard to read – as are most unusual fonts and colors. Simple sans serif fonts like Arial, Helvetica, Verdana work best. If you want to add some zing to your emails, design a personalized signature tag.

10. Attack Attachments | Don’t use them unless they’re critical. Some people have all kinds of graphics files as logos or signatures that appear as attachments at the receiver. Not cool. Time is wasted trying to see if there’s something to open. Even worse is sending text as an attachment when it could just as easily have been included in the body of the email and saved that extra click-and-wait. If you send an invite to an event, it’s fine to include an attachment that announces it visually. But:

  • If there is a URL, include it in text form so it shows up as a clickable link. Or make the whole image itself a clickable link. Not fair to expect someone to retype a url !
  • Please include the location, date and time in text format so that the information can be quickly copied and pasted. That way it can quickly be added to a calendar. (And error free. You don’t want “The Knickerbocker Club, 7:30 PM, black-tie required” to morph into
  • “The Kickboxer Club, 7:30 AM, black-belt required”.)

11. Make it easy to unsubscribe | If you send out email newsletters, please make it easy to stop the flow. Letters that prompt rage are not helping your brand!

12. Think about the thread | Some e-mails depend for their meaning on context. Which means it’s usually right to include the thread which they’re responding to. But it’s rare that a thread should extend to more than 3 emails. Before sending, cut the crap!

13. Don’t reply when angry | Just walk away from the computer. Stamp your feet. Scream out the window. Do not send an email until your emotions have calmed. One rude, jerky email can tar you for life… and spark an even worse response.

14. Use NNTR | “No need to respond.” Use it in a subject line, right before EOM. Or use it at the end of an email. What a gift to your recipient!

15. Pay a voluntary email tax | The reason email is escalating is because it’s free. No one wants to change that… but what if at the end of each month, you quickly totted up how many emails you had sent, multiply by the average number of cc’s, and pay that number of cents into a personal book-buying account. You’ll end up with a lot of great books… and it might just pull you away from the goddam computer for a bit! Speaking of which…

16. Switch off the computer! | This could be the most important rule of all. If we all agreed to spend less time doing email, we’d all get less email! Consider… calendaring half-days at work where you refuse to look at email. Consider… email-free weekends. Consider… setting up the following auto-response. “Thank you for your note. As a personal commitment to my and my family’s mental health, I now do email only on Wednesdays. I’ll reply to as many as I can next Wednesday. Thanks for writing. Don’t forget to smell the roses.”

Oceans Advance Newfoundland and Labrador

Ocean Initiatives British ColumbiaThanks to the Ocean Networks Canada Centre for Enterprise and Engagement for bringing together Ocean Initiatives BC and the Oceans Advance leadership from St. John’s. Today we met with Les O’Reilly, CEO for Ocean Advance. Does it ever make a difference when you have government support. I expect that there will be an alliance formed across the nation to engage on opportunities for the ocean and marinespace. It is odd that there will be support from 2 of Canada’s Regional Economic Diversification organizations, and not the one that serves the Pacific Region.

Port Alberni and the Tseshaht First Nation

It was on a Friday in December that I attended the Alberni Clayoquot Regional District to present a report designed to secure a decision from the founding organization for the Coastal Community Network on whether to reposition or windup the organization. Having presented to the Board, I returned to the City Hall to catch up with Pat Deakin, Alberni’s EDO when I literally ran into Cindy Stern, an RPF that I had met years back.

Ms Stern is now the Chief Operating Officer for the Tseshaht Nation and she was obviously in a rush. She said that her favourite business planner was unavailable and would I help her with a Monday deadline? I said sure, and was sent over to meet Chris Anderson, Financial Officer for the Nation. So as I parked the rental car, I was observed by someone in the parking lot as I entered the facility. By the way, its a beautiful facility.  Sometimes I get hard stares as I have been mistaken for an RCMP Officer when suited up.

I met with Mr. Anderson, who described what he needed in order to secure financing to upgrade a barge for their Marine Company. It is the only one of its kind on the west coast of the island. I stopped him and advised that I would prepare the document for him by Monday at no cost as a measure of goodwill and for future consideration. I want to be that community’s consulting economic developer.

On the way out, I asked to meet his Chief Councillor as I had yet to meet Les Sam as he serves on the Board of Directors for the Coastal Community Network. As it turns out, I was introduced to the fella that was checking me out as I arrived in the parking lot. I have since heard Les Sam speak publicly and I consider him a talented leader on the Coast.

The business case for the Barge Upgrade was delivered on -time and I understand the dollars required where sourced. Also, this was the first time I had seen the leadership of a Regional District, both the position of Chair and Vice Chair, determined by a coin toss.

A Seat at the PNCIMA Table

I have worked for public and private sector interests in the ocean and marinespace category since June 1st 2007. As such, you get to meet a lot of organizations and people. I am disappointed to report today that I was unable to secure a seat at the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area Plan process for4 Ocean Industries BC. The PNCIMA Initiative staff have no category for a broad based organization like Ocean Industries BC and expected that the organization they chose, the BC Chamber of Shipping, to include OIBC in its consultation. The seat given to the Chamber of Shipping is backed up by representative from another Members of the Chamber from the BC Ferry Services Corporation.

I am hopeful that the people running this Federal ocean planning process will allow for a second seat to be led by Ms Kaity Stein of the International Ship Owners Alliance of Canada and Capt. Phill Nelson, CEO of the Council of Marine Carriers.

Lamda Alpha Bravo

Thanks to Cliff Bowman for hosting me to the Vancouver Chapter of this relatively unknown organization:

“Lambda Alpha International, the Honorary Society for the Advancement of Land Economics, was founded in 1930 under the leadership of the renowned land economist and champion of academic freedom, Richard T. Ely. As an honorary society, it provides a forum for the study and advancement of land economics where the “winnowing and sifting” of ideas takes place in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Individuals who have made notable contributions to the study and ethical practice of land use are invited to join Lambda Alpha International. Now numbering more than 2,000 members worldwide, Lambda Alpha International is an apolitical not-for-profit professional organization.
Organizational Goals
The Society’s original goal of “fostering a closer association with academia and professionals involved with land economics and related fields”, while still valid today, has expanded. The Society is now a catalyst for the advancement of land economics by facilitating the interaction of members who have distinguished themselves in their professions, their communities and through academic achievements. Lambda Alpha International provides an opportunity for distinguished practitioners and scholars to come together in fellowship to discuss, debate and perhaps solve dilemmas involving use of our land resources.”

I saw an old friend that I hadn’t seen since departing Toronto. Glenn Miller was in town on Canadian Urban Institute business where he serves as the Vice President. Glenn and I used to cut and paste the Ontario Professional Planning Institute Monthly News Magazine on his kitchen table before I got an Apple 512K Macintosh. Then we did it online. That was the spring of 1984 when I was still a practicing urban and reginal planner and a Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners.

Lambda Alpha International, the Honorary Society for the Advancement of Land Economics, was founded in 1930 under the leadership of the renowned land economist and champion of academic freedom, Richard T. Ely. As an honorary society, it provides a forum for the study and advancement of land economics where the “winnowing and sifting” of ideas takes place in an atmosphere of mutual respect.Individuals who have made notable contributions to the study and ethical practice of land use are invited to join Lambda Alpha International. Now numbering more than 2,000 members worldwide, Lambda Alpha International is an apolitical not-for-profit professional organization.

Organizational Goals
The Society’s original goal of “fostering a closer association with academia and professionals involved with land economics and related fields”, while still valid today, has expanded. The Society is now a catalyst for the advancement of land economics by facilitating the interaction of members who have distinguished themselves in their professions, their communities and through academic achievements. Lambda Alpha International provides an opportunity for distinguished practitioners and scholars to come together in fellowship to discuss, debate and perhaps solve dilemmas involving use of our land resources.

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